JICAMARCA RADIO OBSERVATORY

JRO

GEOSPACE

Geospace
Phenomena occurring in the upper layers
of the Earth’s atmosphere

Slide LEARN MORE The Geospace Sciences program aims to generate scientific knowledge about the phenomena occurring in the upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere around the equatorial region and in the space surrounding the Earth, in order to understand their origin and dynamics. These studies will allow us to model the origin of these phenomena and forecast their occurrence and impact on Peruvian technology and livelihoods. FUNCTIONS • Generate scientific knowledge about the phenomena occurring in the upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere (particularly in the equatorial ionosphere) and in the space around the Earth.
• Develop physical or statistical models about the origin and dynamics of the ionospheric and upper atmospheric phenomena that will eventually allow us to forecast their occurrence.
• To promote public awareness about the variability of space weather and the effects that ionospheric phenomena can have on people's livelihoods.
• Conduct scientific studies on the phenomena occurring in the ionosphere and upper atmosphere (particularly in the equatorial region) and in the space surrounding the Earth.
• Monitor and observe the equatorial ionosphere and upper atmosphere in order to measure the different physical parameters of these regions and to detect the phenomena that occur in them covering altitudes from 60 km to 2,000 km.
• Carry out observations of meteors and other celestial bodies in order to complement our studies and observations of space weather.
OBJECTIVES ABOUT GEOSPACE To conduct our research, we have a variety of scientific instruments and facilities for the observation and monitoring of the upper atmosphere and geospace phenomena, which generate high quality data and information suitable for the study of these regions. Among these instruments, the IGP has the largest and most powerful ionospheric or incoherent scatter radar in the world located at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. With this powerful radar, measurements of the different physical parameters of the ionosphere and observations of the phenomena that occur in it are made covering regions from 60 km to 2000 km in height.

For the same purpose, we have complementary instruments to the Jicamarca radar, such as magnetometers, GNNS receivers, ionosondes, interferometers, and other smaller radars that are part of a network of geophysical instruments distributed in Peru and other South American countries.